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What Are the Risks Associated with the CDC’s Recommended Tetanus Vaccines?

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend vaccination against tetanus beginning at two months of age. According to the CDC, children should receive a total of five doses of the DTaP vaccine before age six, preteens should receive a Tdap vaccine between the ages of 11 and 12, and adults should receive a Td or Tdap booster every 10 years.

While the CDC considers the tetanus vaccines (DTaP, Tdap and Td) to be safe for most people, it notes that “[b]ecause of age or health conditions, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them.” The CDC also recognizes several possible side effects, which it classifies as “mild” in most cases. But, like all vaccines, the tetanus vaccines carry certain risks, and tetanus vaccine recipients can experience serious complications in some cases.

Tetanus Vaccine Injuries Covered Under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP)

In certain cases, individuals and families who are coping with the effects of tetanus vaccine injuries can file claims for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Currently, there are four medical conditions listed as “on table” injuries for the tetanus vaccines under the VICP, which means that eligible claimants can seek compensation without proof of causation.

The four “on table” injuries for the tetanus vaccines under the VICP are:

1. Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is an acute hypersensitivity (or allergic) reaction that causes the body to go into shock. Swelling, hives, rashes and a sudden drop in blood pressure are all signs that a tetanus vaccine recipient may be at risk for going into shock—and that emergency medical treatment may be necessary. Anaphylaxis is an “on table” injury for the tetanus vaccine when symptoms onset within four hours of vaccination.

2. Brachial Neuritis

Brachial neuritis (also known as Parsonage-Turner Syndrome) is a neurological disorder that can disrupt communication throughout the body. Early symptoms include pain on one side of the body, severe pain in the upper arm or shoulder, and loss of sensation or feeling in the arm or shoulder. Brachial neuritis is an “on table” injury for the tetanus vaccines when symptoms onset between two and 28 days following vaccination.

3. Shoulder Injuries Related to Vaccine Administration (SIRVA)

Shoulder injuries related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) are a risk with all vaccines administered via shoulder injection. Pain and limited mobility in the shoulder are the most common symptoms. SIRVA is an “on table” injury for the tetanus vaccines when symptoms onset within 48 hours of vaccination.

4. Vasovagal Syncope

Vasovagal syncope is characterized by a sudden drop in blood pressure that results in fainting. Sweating, paleness, nausea and a rapid heartbeat are signs that a tetanus vaccine recipient may be about to faint. Vasovagal syncope is an “on table” injury for the tetanus vaccines when symptoms onset within one hour of vaccination.

Discuss Your Tetanus Vaccine Injury Claim with Attorney Leah V. Durant

If you or a loved one has experienced a tetanus vaccine injury, your family may be entitled to financial compensation under the VICP. To learn more in a free and confidential consultation with vaccine attorney Leah V. Durant, please call 202-800-1711 or send us a message online today.

Leah Durant Bio

Experienced litigation attorney Leah Durant focuses on representing clients in complex vaccine litigation matters. Leah Durant is the owner and principal attorney of the Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC, a litigation firm based in Washington, DC. Leah Durant and her staff represent clients and their families who suffer from vaccine-related injuries, adverse vaccine reactions and vaccine-related deaths. The Law Offices of Leah V. Durant, PLLC is dedicated to assisting individuals in recovering the highest level of compensation as quickly and efficiently as possible. To learn more, contact vaccine attorney Leah Durant today.

About Leah Durant

Leah Durant is a former U.S. Department of Justice trial attorney who specializes in vaccine injury claims covered by the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. These cases are filed before the U.S. Court of Federal Claims (more commonly known as the “vaccine court”) in Washington, DC, where she has been admitted to practice since 2008. Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Leah Durant is a graduate of the University of Maryland College Park and received her law degree from the University of Maryland School of Law. Leah Durant’s legal practice concentrates on litigating complex vaccine injury and medical related cases. She has an extensive legal background and has experience representing individuals with complex medical claims.

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